Now Playing Tracks

You’ll Never Get to Heaven - ‘Adorn’

Canadian dream-pop duo. Their latest EP of the same name, Adorn, is available digitally now at the band’s Bandcamp courtesy of Mystic Roses Records.

Listen to this and just imagine yourself drifting all the way out into the Atlantic where, come nightfall, it’s just you and the unobstructed canopy of stars above, the infinite black expanse of sea and sky surrounding you. Sublime.

Eliot Sumner - ‘Come Friday’

Eliot “Coco” Sumner (aka Sting’s daughter) used to make electro-pop under the moniker I Blame Coco. Now she’s recording under her real name, with an EP out next week and an album to follow sometime next year. In a press release, she says she’s been influenced by a recent krautrock listening spree, and you can sort of see that in the driving bass riffs of ‘Come Friday.’ She also says that the song is about “still being in love with someone but not allowing them to have another life. It’s very selfish.”

(Source: stereogum.com / Eliot Sumner)

Margaret Chardiet, aka Pharmakon, will release a new LP this year to follow-up last year’s Abandon. It’s called Bestial Burden, and it’s out October 14 via Sacred Bones. Find a trailer for the LP above, directed by Jacqueline Castel.

Bestial Burden was written while Chardiet was recovering from major surgery. It was recorded with Sean Ragon, who she worked with on Abandon, at Heaven Street in Brooklyn.

(Source: pitchfork.com)

Janelle Monáe - ‘Electric Lady’ [Official Music Video]

Janelle Monáe has shared the video for ‘Electric Lady’, the title track from her 2013 record. It’s set at a somewhat-futuristic college party and features cameos from T.I., Estelle, Esperanza Spalding, T-Boz, Monica, Kimbra, Joi, choreographer Fatima Robinson, and Monáe’s mother (at the beginning), among others. Per the press release, Monáe “took the opportunity to celebrate several ‘Electric Ladies’ in her life.”

So much love for Janelle!

women-in-music:

Guilhermina Suggia (27 June 1885 – 30 July 1950).

Portuguese cellist born in Porto; at the age of 12 she was appointed principal cellist of the local orchestra, the Orpheon Portuense. In 1904, under the patronage of Queen Maria Amélia of Portugal, she went to study at the Leipzig Conservatoire, Germany under Julius Klengel and built an international reputation.

She spent many years living in England, where she was particularly celebrated. She retired in 1939, but emerged from retirement to give concerts in Britain. She gave her last concerts at the Edinburgh Festival in 1949 and in Bournemouth later the same year. Guilhermina bequeathed her Stradivarius cello to the Royal Academy of Music in London, to be sold to fund a scholarship for young cellists.

Suggia died of cancer in Porto at the age of 65.

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